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Podcast Ep.#40 Breaking the Norm.

Welcome to episode #40 and in this episode the team ( John Safari, Kevin Martin, Dave and Savion) talk about the importance of knowing how things work in the local music scene. Having some sort of knowledge of what goes down when booking shows. The importance of befriending and working alongside bands that are in the same genre and style. A glance on proper online branding and promotions. New episodes every Monday! Click here to subscribe.

BREAKING NEWS | Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington Commits Suicide

Police sources have notified that the singer has hanged himself at a private residence in Palos Verdes Estates in L.A County. His body was discovered just before 9am. Chester was married with 6 children from 2 wives.
The singer struggled with drugs and alcohol for years and has considered suicide due to being abused as a child.
May he Rest In Peace, his music and art will live forever in our minds and hearts.

Here is some of his music to remember him by:

 

If you have suicide thoughts reach out please call the national suicide prevention line 1800 273-8255 
24/7 someone will listen to you. Your Life is too precious!

Check out this website for more information on suicide or if you need help AFSP | Find Support Page
You can also get info via twitter by checking out the LifeLine Website

How to Identify & Help Those at Risk of Suicide | OCML AFSP Benefit Show

5 ways to identify those in risk. 

1. Clinical depression — deep sadness, loss of interest, trouble sleeping and eating

2. Having a “death wish,” tempting fate by taking risks that could lead to death, such as driving fast or running red lights

3. Losing interest in things one used to care about

4. Making comments about being hopeless, helpless, or worthless

5. Sudden, unexpected switch from being very sad to being very calm and or appearing happy.

3 Things You Can Do To Help Those At Risk

1. Be attentive to the signals listed above and be aware of the mental and emotional states of those around you.

2. If someone you know appears depressed and contemplating suicide, take that person seriously. Listen to what they have to say.

3. Listen to them attentively and do not try to argue with them. Recommend that they seek a mental health professional.

 

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US and it costs 51 billion Dollars annually. Men die by suicide 3.5x more often than women. OCML and AFSP are joining together this week to bring into light some of the facts and statistics about suicide and also lead into the weekend with a benefit show for this cause. We hope you learn a little bit more about this topic and see you at the benefit show this weekend with a friend or a loved one.

Learn more about this topic by clicking here AFSP.com 
Learn more about the Benefit Show by clicking here OCML/ASPC Benefit Show

4 Misconceptions About Suicide | OCML AFSP Benefit Show

1. Myth: Only crazy people commit suicide.

FACT: Although most suicidal people are very unhappy, most suicidal acts are committed by people that aren’t characterized as psychotic. Thus, they are generally rational and in tough with reality. 75% of those who commit suicide are, however, clinically depressed.

2. Myth: People who talk about or threaten suicide don’t do it.

FACT: A large percentage of people who threaten suicide carry out their threats. Take all threats seriously.

3. Myth: People who really want to die will find a way; it won’t help to try and stop them.

FACT: Most suicidal people are highly ambivalent (unsure) about suicide. They are torn between a desire to live and a desire to die.

4. Myth: One should not try to discuss suicide with depressed people. It might give them the idea or upset them enough to “push them over the edge.” The best thing to do is ignore it.

FACT: Suicidal people are commonly greatly relieved to be able to talk about it.


Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US and it costs 51 billion Dollars annually. Men die by suicide 3.5x more often than women. OCML and AFSP are joining together this week to bring into light some of the facts and statistics about suicide and also lead into the weekend with a benefit show for this cause. We hope you learn a little bit more about this topic and see you at the benefit show this weekend with a friend or a loved one.

Learn more about this topic by clicking here AFSP.com 
Learn more about the Benefit Show by clicking here OCML/ASPC Benefit Show

3 tips on how to write and submit your press kit to writers and media sources.

One of the keys to writing – in any discipline – is to know your audience. When you’re submitting your press kit to writers, obviously you’re not going to know everything there is to know about every writer that you contact. I don’t pretend to speak for all writers, but I will tell you some things that are a real turnoff for me. And maybe these tips will help you know your audience just a little better when you start sending out your press kit.

Get to the point. Let’s face it. This is a good idea no matter what you’re writing. This is a particularly good idea when it comes to music journalists because we receive a lot of music pitches. With that in mind, what do you think happens with the band that writes a 12- or 13-paragraph pitch (trust me, I’ve seen them) about why the journalist should listen to and cover the band’s music? If you guessed that those long pitches get relegated to second (or later) thoughts, you’re correct. Let’s just say that I receive 12-15 music pitches a day, which is not out of the realm of possibility. I don’t want to have to read a novella about every band. Your pitch should be limited in length. Four or five paragraphs should be enough. If you have a hard time making your point in that limited amount of space, I know a writer you can hire to help you out.

 

You don’t get extra points for using big words. Before you jump to any conclusions, I’m not saying that music journalists aren’t smart. Nor am I saying that there is no time or place for those $100 words. What I am saying with this one is that you are not writing this for a college composition professor. In other words, you don’t have to write it like you would a college essay. I have seen the words amorphous and ephemeral (among others) in music pitches. You know how I said that I receive lots of music? Well, I don’t want to run for my dictionary with every music pitch that I read. Give me a real description of your music without using words that would make your college professor beam with pride.

Make it easy for the writer.
I’m not saying you have to pander to music journalists and make things simple for them. However, when you send a pitch about your music, you’re basically sending your resume. So just like when you send a resume for a job, you don’t want to waste the time of the recipient. Making it simple means that we are more likely to listen to your music. Here’s what I mean specifically by making it simple: make your pitch a one-stop shop. Give a brief intro to your band. Then do one of the following. Either include a full-length song or video in your message or provide a link where the writer can hear more than a 30-second sample of your music. Yes, music journalists are busy people, but a 30-second sample of a song is like giving someone two bites of an entree. Any musician can make music that sounds good for 30 seconds (although many don’t). For me to judge whether I want to write about your music, I need at least one full song. If I like that one, I’ll seek out another one. Or an entire album. The point is that I don’t want to go scouring the web looking for your tunes, nor do I want to go to iTunes and hear just a sample of your music. So make it easy and include one in your pitch.

So there you have it: a brief guide to knowing your audience when you start to reach out to music journalists. When all else fails, just remember that acronym KISS: Keep it simple, Slick.

Check out the latest segment of the OCML ReAmp Sessions featuring Krista Marina

Every thursday we feature one great artist that has that ability to express themselves on both acoustic and non acoustic settings. This week we featured Krista Marina, a singer song writer from Southern California. Check out her acoustic performance performed at ReAmp Studios in Tustin Ca.

Check out her website for more great music and upcoming events at www.kristamarina.com 

New Podcast is out! Listen as the team talk about what grinds their gears and what can be done to solve it.

Recorded from the beautiful LA Radio Studio in San Pedro Ca. The team gets together this week to participate in this month’s Rants and Raves Episode of the OCML Podcast. They talk about what gets them going at shows, with bands, life and how it can be solved Don’t miss an episode and subscribe to our itunes podcast. Click Here to subscribe!